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Good call by Carroll but better play by Butler

Pete Carroll's call wasn't bad, it just didn't work. But instead of criticizing him, give credit to Malcolm Butler for making a remarkable play.

Pete Carroll’s call wasn’t bad, it just didn’t work. But instead of criticizing him, give credit to Malcolm Butler for making a remarkable play.

It was only a bad play call because it didn’t work out. Pete Carroll is being blasted for not handing the ball off in a short-yardage situation to Marshawn Lynch, maybe the toughest power back in the league who earned his nickname “beast mode” for a good reason. But if Malcolm Butler didn’t make an absolutely incredible play on the ball and Ricard Lockette caught the touchdown all we would be talking about is how smart…no, how genius Carroll was for catching the Patriots defense off guard by throwing the ball.

If the New Orleans Saints didn’t recover their onside kick and they lost the game, we’d be calling Sean Payton the biggest bonehead in football for attempting that in a Super Bowl. But that play worked out and all we remember is how it helped the Saints beat the Colts.

First thing’s first, Butler made an incredible play on the ball. He stared down Wilson, read Lockette’s route and bolted full speed to where the ball was being thrown and beat the Seahawks receiver there. Had Butler, an undrafted rookie cornerback from West Alabama, not made a play no undrafted rookie cornerback from West Alabama should ever be expected to make, then the Seahawks would have scored the touchdown.

It was second and goal from the one yard line and 27 seconds to go. Had Lynch been stopped short, there was enough time to call a time out and run another play. However, feeding the guy who led them to that point was the obvious call and the Patriots knew that too.

The Patriots lined up with nine men on the line of scrimmage — eight in the box and a corner not too far away on the right side. Brandon Browner was the cornerback up on the line directly against Jermaine Kearse and Butler was back a bit further on the outside of the receivers. Throwing a quick slant to Lockette with Kearse screening both corners was a good decision but Butler made a remarkable play and intercepted the pass. If anything, Butler should be given all the credit in the world for reading the play the second Lockette turned his ankle off the snap to give himself the ability and positioning to make a play like that in a high pressure situation.

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Corey Johns

Editor in Chief
You could say Corey was born to become a sports journalist. His father won a national championship coaching college soccer. His mother is a baseball fanatic who hasn't missed seeing an Orioles game since 1983 (literally, sometimes it's annoying). His great uncle was a big-time boxing promoter and his maternal grandfather was once a department head at the Baltimore Sun. Basically, sports and journalism run through his blood. He played just about every little league sports there was when he was a kid and was a multi-sport athlete in high school; even playing in the first-ever high school sanction Rugby game in the country. Eventually he retired from sports as an undefeated Maryland state Rugby champion as a high school senior. Perhaps lack of athletic talent has more to do with the retirement, but he will tell you that it more had to do with a great desire to jump right into media. Upon his graduation from University of Maryland, Baltimore County as a triple communications major, Corey started the So Much Sports network and has continued to grow his websites and continues to work to make them premier sports media outlets.
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