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Louisville got robbed of Orange Bowl appearance

Lamar Jackson leading the Louisville Cardinals to a one-sided 63-20 victory over Florida State was one of the most impressive wins of the 2016 season, but clearly meant nothing since the Seminoles were picked over the Cardinals for a spot in the Orange Bowl.

Lamar Jackson leading the Louisville Cardinals to a one-sided 63-20 victory over Florida State was one of the most impressive wins of the 2016 season, but clearly meant nothing since the Seminoles were picked over the Cardinals for a spot in the Orange Bowl.

There is no other way to put it: Louisville got robbed.

Even despite questions about Washington’s non-conference strength of schedule, there is way to understand and validate ever pick the college football selection committee made for each of the New Year’s Six bowl games, except for the decision to put Florida State ahead of Louisville into the Orange Bowl.

This move screams corporate politicking; wanting the Florida team to play in the bowl game in Florida. The Seminoles simply are the bigger program with a better fan base and with an in-state game they would have a great chance to bring a ton of revenue to the gates for that game.

Louisville, a program not particularly known for their football that nobody really expected to be in this position before the season, isn’t the national brand that Florida State is, but deserved to be in the Orange Bowl over the Seminoles, pretty easily too.

It was a long time ago, but on September 17 when Florida State was ranked as the No. 2 team in the country, Lamar Jackson and the Louisville Cardinals destroyed the Seminoles, 63-20. It was never even close as Jackson amassed over 350 total yards and five touchdowns, with four of them coming on the ground.

Louisville certainly faded at the end of the year while the Seminoles got better, but that head-to-head victory for the Cardinals was way too one-sided to be glossed over like it apparently was. That is why they play the games and settle these arguments on the field. Louisville won the argument in a landslide. On top of that, they finished two games better than them in the same division, the ACC Atlantic.

The selection committee argued the value of head-to-head matchups both as important and not in their picks. Penn State’s head-to-head victory over Ohio State didn’t matter despite the Nittany Lions also winning the same division they were in and the Big Ten conference, but didn’t put the Nittany Lions into the playoffs because they suffered a 39-point loss to Michigan, which heading into the final week was ranked ahead of them and made it hard to justify putting the Nittany Lions in over the Wolverines. Florida State’s loss was by an even worst margin.

Louisville should have been in the Orange Bowl. It’s a shame they aren’t.

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Corey Johns

Editor in Chief
You could say Corey was born to become a sports journalist. His father won a national championship coaching college soccer. His mother is a baseball fanatic who hasn't missed seeing an Orioles game since 1983 (literally, sometimes it's annoying). His great uncle was a big-time boxing promoter and his maternal grandfather was once a department head at the Baltimore Sun. Basically, sports and journalism run through his blood. He played just about every little league sports there was when he was a kid and was a multi-sport athlete in high school; even playing in the first-ever high school sanction Rugby game in the country. Eventually he retired from sports as an undefeated Maryland state Rugby champion as a high school senior. Perhaps lack of athletic talent has more to do with the retirement, but he will tell you that it more had to do with a great desire to jump right into media. Upon his graduation from University of Maryland, Baltimore County as a triple communications major, Corey started the So Much Sports network and has continued to grow his websites and continues to work to make them premier sports media outlets.

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