Breaking News:

Keep up with So Much Sports on Twitter @SoMuchSports

Sports Hall of Fame

Lou GehrigLou Gehrig

Known as “The Iron Horse” for his incredible durability that led to playing in 2,130-consecutive games, a record that stood for 56 years before Cal Ripken, Jr broke it in 1995, Gehrig won six World Series championships and was a seven-time All-Star in 17 seasons. Gehrig was a two-time AL MVP, set records for most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez), led the American League in RBIs five times, home runs three times and had the highest batting average in 1934, a year he won the Triple Crown. Gehrig’s career was cut short when at 36-years-old he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and forced to retire. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80